Articles Posted in the " Kids Films " Category

  • Hotel Transylvania

    In a month that’s already overcrowded with supernatural themed animations, Hotel Transylvania is the runt of the litter. Frantic, over-manic direction, a severe dearth of laughs and a predictable plot are bad enough, but when you factor in Adam Sandler trampling all over proceedings and doing another Stupid Fucking Voice, then you’ve really got problems.


  • Frankenweenie

    Frankenweenie sees Tim Burton return not only to his 1984 short-film of the same name – and not only to the stop-motion animation style he utilised on Corpse Bride – but also to the sort of smart, Gothic quasi-horror that made his name. And the results are, pleasingly, very much the Tim Burton of old.


  • ParaNorman

    Throughout their cinematic careers, zombies have been variously utilised as brain-munching bogeymen, rage-addled viral threats and social-political analogies. Don’t let ParaNorman‘s PG-rating fool you, this is a movie with a subversive streak that George A. Romero himself would be proud of.


  • Brave

    It has been a while since we last saw an animated princess on our screens and even longer since there was one that was genuinely stong. Crowned with a head of red curls and more arrows than even Katniss Everdeen could shoot per second, Princess Merida is a feisty redhead obsessed with her fate. If you are thinking of changing your own destiny, just make sure to pick a better witch to help you then Merida does…


  • Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax

    “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.” Deep stuff there from the master of children’s stories, Dr Seuss. Sadly it seems that the makers of the film version did not care at all, because The Lorax is a multicoloured mess. The Lorax shoves anti-capitalism messages in your face faster than a bear can shove marshmallows into its mouth. That probably makes a bit more sense if you have already seen the film. Take it from me though, it is pretty darn fast.


  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days

    Lazy performances, ugly babies and false sincerity abound in the third film adaptation of Jeff Kinney’s hideously successful series of children’s tales. Though oddly proficient in the realm of physical slapstick, Dog Days falls flat even in the eyes of tiny humans addled with sugar; one shining musical interlude, however, rescues this film from joining the ranks of insults to child-IQ such as Ice Age: Continental Drift.


  • Ice Age: Continental Drift

    Ice Age 4 hurtles from one boring and entirely unoriginal scenario to another, justifying its glaring historical and chronological inaccuracies, hopeless characters, tedious plot and joyless slapstick by covering them in frozen precipitation. It’s just a rehash of previous Ice Age themes and scenes from other, better films, but told by prehistoric animals that existed millions of years apart. Sure it’s for kids, but a cinema full of children could only muster the occasional half-hearted chuckle and even the sound of Sid regurgitating something into his paw couldn’t mask the sound of artistic integrity quietly dying.


  • Top Cat

    Top Cat: The Movie should have been like going to have dinner with an old friend and finding out they were happily married, working away at their dream job and as pleasant and courteous as you’d always remembered them. Instead, it was like bumping into an old friend in a darkened alleyway and finding out that they’re now a crack-addled prostitute with no qualms about eating people’s faces. Seriously.


  • Mirror Mirror

    Snow White is a classic tale of true love, unfathomable evil and the perils of vanity. Mirror Mirror, on the other hand, is a story about the classic heroine getting riled up about taxes and joining a group of bandits…


  • The Pirates! In An Adventure With Scientists

    With a plot as cheerfully convoluted as its title, viewers might start to feel sea-sick trying to keep up with the ridiculous twists and turns of The Pirates! In An Adventure With Scientists. But does it matter? Not really. This is home-made Aardman animation at its most visually dazzling, and the love, humour and detail locked in every frame ensures that story quibbles are soon tossed over-board.