Articles Posted in the " Psycho " Category

  • Top 5 places we’d rather stay than Sochi

    The world’s press has descended upon Sochi, home of this year’s Winter Olympics, to discover that you really shouldn’t let former KGB agents with latent sexuality issues to design an international sports centre. Twitter is rife with stories of missing floors, broken doors and filthy water in the official press hotels; although we obviously have zero interest in sports journalism, here are some Hollywood hostelries that, on balance, we’d rather frequent.


  • Psychoanalysis… in 10 Easy Films

    Psychoanalysis has been tormenting society with its uncomfortable conclusions about your mum for the last century. It has had a huge influence on film, giving filmmakers the opportunity to explore the dark dank recesses of the human psyche while still entertaining with vague references to “penis envy” and “momma’s boy”. We here at Best For Film have dedicated our lives to reducing entire film genres, movements and occasionally random objects (like glasses, or zoos) into easy-to-read lists, and as such we have launched a new blog series, starting with this one: Psychoanalysis in 10 Easy Films.


  • Crawl

    Crawl is guaranteed to put a smile on anybody’s face – which is extremely awkward, as it’s supposed to be a horror film. Illogical action sequences, unbelievable characters and enough violins to give Fantasia a run for its money, this movie just falls short of the “so bad, it’s good” category….


  • Hitchcock

    What with Toby Jones playing Alfred Hitchcock in a new TV drama, there’s only question on everyone’s minds: who wins Best Hitchcock Impersonator, Toby Jones or Anthony Hopkins? The new biopic of the ‘Master of Suspense’ is certainly stylish, but lacks plausibility as it introduces a fictitious storyline between Hitchcock’s wife and Whitfield Cook. That being said, it’s entertaining and breathes new life into Alma Reville, ‘the woman behind the man’.




  • Straw Dogs

    Rod Lurie’s remake of Sam Peckinpah’s controversial thriller follows the original virtually beat-for-beat – except where it matters. As a stand alone film it’s OK, but held up to the original it feels almost entirely pointless. Half a star goes to James Marsden’s lovely curly hair.


  • Top 10 awful things film posters do to the English language

    In many ways, film posters exist outside the tightly wrought bonds of grammar and punctuation. As stepping stones to another higher, inherently visual medium they do not have to conform to the petty linguistic scrabblings that the rest of us mere mortals cut our gums over. They can damn well do whatever they please; whatever it takes to get across their meaning. Except, of course, they obviously can’t. Obviously.