Articles Posted in the " Frost/Nixon " Category

  • Top 10 Greatest Movie Presidents

    With Barack Obama’s long road to keeping the White House finally over, let’s cast an eye back and explore the truly great presidents of history. Eight of them are fictional and one doesn’t have a name, but they remain icons of dignity, sleaziness, oratory and badassery. Everything we should expect from the man in charge.



  • Top 10 Presidents in Film

    You know who’s great? President Barack Obama. Not only is he unsettlingly charismatic he has also just declared (finally) that he is in favour of same sex marriage, effectively kicking all his Republican opponents in their rigidly conservative/homophobic nuts. TAKE THAT TO YO’ TEA PARTY, NEWT. In honour of this momentous occasion (and also to herald the almost release of this gem), BFF brings you the Top Ten list of movie presidents (both fictional and non-fictional for double the pleasure!).


  • The Slipper And The Rose

    Uncalled for reissue of lengthy, vanilla flavoured telling of Cinderella, most famous for being mocked as David Frost’s pet project in Frost/ Nixon. Nice outfits, all the same.



  • Top ten films which should be remade by Arnold Schwarzenegger

    We’ve all heard the good news – the Governator has hung up his democratic sash and is preparing to step back into his loincloth/leather jacket/commando boots of unremitting ass-kickery for some new and crunchy films. Among the fifteen projects Arnie is reportedly considering are remakes of Predator and True Lies, as well as yet another Terminator sequel; but we think he should be diversifying…



  • Frost/Nixon

    King of the American historical epic Ron Howard returns to form with Frost/Nixon. Based on Peter Morgan’s Tony-award winning Broadway play, the film chronicles ex-US President Richard Nixon’s infamous admission of wrongdoing in David Frost’s interview series in 1977. Howard’s intimate dual narrative draws you expertly into the lives of both the interviewer and his subject, while Michael Sheen and Frank Langella inhabit their characters with studied perfection. Despite its somewhat dry subject matter, you’ll find yourself fascinated by this battle-of-wits tale by the time the credits come up.